Tag Archives: rosarito beach

In Ensenada, Cheap Mexican Charms Await

 

TRAVEL
In Ensenada, Cheap Mexican Charms Await
Jan.14.2015

For as long as I can remember, Ensenada has had a whiff of south-of-the-border excess and spring-break stigma. Less than two hours from San Diego, down the Baja California peninsula, it’s one of the easiest and safest places to experience Mexico on a budget — which makes it easy to think of this small coastal city and cruise line layover as a sort of Mexico for Beginners. But dismissing northwest Baja is a mistake. Beyond the souvenir shops selling sombreros, knockoff artesanía (handicrafts) and tacky T-shirts, there’s a college town, a port town and a budding culinary capital that invite exploration. While Ensenada and the surrounding area can require a bit of patience, its pleasures are worth the time it takes to find them — and all the more so because they can be had so affordably.

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A restaurant at La Bufadora, a powerful blowhole where families pose for photos as the Pacific sprays them with sea mist. Credit Freda Moon

 

I’ve had an affection for Ensenada since childhood, when it was a daylong car ride from my Northern California hometown and my introduction to international travel. In those days, I’ll admit, its beaches looked cleaner and the Pacific Ocean felt warmer. My brother and I would sip virgin piña coladas and spend hours scouring the beach for sand dollars. In college, it remained exotic in my mind — a place Tim, my then-boyfriend (now-husband), and I could go on winter break and feel like adventurous runaways. These days, Ensenada is simply the closest we can get to the Mexico we love without a plane ticket.

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New lanes ease wait times at border

 

New lanes ease wait times at border
By Sandra Dibble 6:36 P.M.SEPT. 17, 2014

SAN YSIDRO — Could long lines at the San Ysidro Port of Entry be largely in the past?

Many drivers accustomed to waiting in line for hours instead sailed through the busy border crossing within minutes on Wednesday.

What made it possible was the reopening of seven inspection lanes — and the completion of a key phase in the $741 million reconstruction of the massive port, the busiest on the U.S.-Mexico border.

Long Lines Disappear

Wednesday afternoon the lines at the San Ysidro Port of Entry were incredibly short, sometimes as small as 3-4 cars. Sean M. Haffey U-T San Diego

The expanded capacity in the primary inspection lanes means that U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the agency charged with operating the port of entry, now has at its disposal 25 rebuilt inspection lanes with total of 46 booths. And that’s just the beginning: By January 2018, the port is expected to grow to 34 lanes with 63 booths.

“This is incredible. I can’t believe it. There’s something like 15 cars ahead of me,” said Marco Montano, as he waited early Wednesday afternoon to cross in the general lanes, which are usually the longest. He and a friend were heading from Tijuana to San Diego to purchase a bus part and had been prepared for the usual wait of two to three hours — not 10 minutes.

And so the cars flowed into San Diego from Tijuana: A grandmother returning from a family visit, an unemployed man from Spring Valley coming back from a doctor’s appointment, a construction worker from Lake Elsinore going home after visiting family in Rosarito Beach.

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Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

The words that real estate professionals choose to describe a property in listing ads could potentially result in the home selling for a premium, suggests an analysis that looks at listing descriptions and their effect on sales price and probability of sale. For example, property descriptor words in listing ads, like granite countertops and wood-burning fireplace, can help net higher sales prices.

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Researcher Bennie Waller, a professor of finance and real estate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., found that each property characteristic mentioned in a listing increases the sale price by just under 1 percent and it’s probability of selling by, on average, 9.2 percent.

“That means a listing with 15 additional property characteristics sells for roughly a 13.5 percent price premium,” says Waller, who excluded standard features in his analysis, such as bedrooms. Waller and his co-authors examined more than 16,300 transactions between March 2000 and February 2009 from a south central Virginia MLS. read more »

After The Kids Have Gone: Former Spring Break Destination In Mexico Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper

 

After The Kids Have Gone: Former Spring Break Destination In Mexico Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper
By Rebekah SagerPublished July 18, 2014Fox News Latino

Town Once Known For Spring Breakers Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper

The Rosarito Beach area of Baja California in Mexico, once a thriving spring break locale that was decimated by crime and a collapsing economy, has had to find new, quieter ways to prosper.

Until 2008 or so, Rosarito Beach, about 10 miles south of the United States-Mexico border in Baja California, was a hot spot for kids on spring break looking to drink tequila, eat cheap lobster dinners and party the days and nights away. Then the economy crashed and crime reached epidemic proportions and suddenly the streets went from 24 hour fiesta to ghost town.

Baja Fresh Produce

The Rosarito Beach area of Baja California in Mexico, once a thriving spring break locale that was decimated by crime and a collapsing economy, has had to find new, quieter ways to prosper.

Until recently, that is. Today Rosarito is a thriving place for families, foodies and small businesses.

A visit to the only winery in Rosarito, Claudius, provides a glimpse into the innovation and resilience desperate (and resourceful) business owners in the area have gone through.

Julio Benitez, a native of Segovia, Spain, established the business just four years ago, and only this year is the label releasing its first bottles onto the market. The vinyard caters primarily to aficionados who can take classes at a small wine-making school, and a tasting room and restaurant for enthusiasts who would rather savor it.

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1 Picudas Este, Las Gaviotas in Rosarito Beach 22710

 

1 Picudas Este, Las Gaviotas in Rosarito Beach 22710

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Casa Piedra

Nestled along the Baja Coast, a mere 1 hour from downtown San Diego, is the exclusive oceanfront hamlet of Las Gaviotas. For over thirty years this community has set the standard for coastal living in the Northern Baja corridor. A secure community with exemplary amenities, Las Gaviotas is home to the most esteemed estates on the Baja Coast.

http://www.bajarealestategroup.net/images/virtual_tours/html/1_casa_piedra_back_patio.html

Experience the winery, dining and beauty of Baja California, Mexico

 

Experience the winery, dining and beauty of Baja California, Mexico
Jan 12, 2014
By Fernanda Beccaglia   

Approximately only 10 percent of Baja California’s wine gets exported, meaning you will need to make a trip to the area, specifically Valley of Guadalupe, to sample it for yourself–personally, I don’t mind.

Some of the popular varieties you will find include Chenin Blanc, Colombard, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tempranillo, Zinfandel, Malbec and Barbera.

If you are planning a trip any time soon to Mexico’s Baja California, here are my top suggestions.

wine in Baja California

Only 10 percent of the wine in Baja California is exported. Experience wine tasting, dining and travel destinations to its finest in the Mexican city. (Shutterstock)

Editor’s Top Choice
2005 Zinfandel Cru Garage, Torres Alegre y Familia

Graduated in Agricultural Engineering, Víctor Torres Alegre, owner and enologist, is the first enologist in Mexico to have a Ph.D. in the Science of Enology.

He received his doctorate from the University of Bordeaux, France, and has formulated innovative ideas and practices for winemaking that have been accepted throughout.

Its winery blends delicately into the dusty Baja Californian landscape, amid vineyards and olive groves.

His wine reflects his devoted passion and dedication to winemaking for over 30 years.

Signature wines

  • Cru Garage: Zinfandel, 75 percent Tempranillo – 25 percent Petit Verdot, Grenache and Nebbiolo
  • La Llave Blanca: (50 percent Sauvignon Blanc, 40 percent Chenin Blanc and 10 percent Moscatel)
  • La Llave Tinta: (70 percent Cabernet Franc, 20 percent Merlot and 10 percent Cabernet Sauvignon)

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Huge Dolphin Pod at Calafia Condos – Baja Real Estate Group

 

Calafia Condos Resort & Villas. The area sits on a privileged location that is a window to an assortment of marine wild life, from sea lions, seals, seagulls to dolphins, whales and even orcas.


This video is a common sight for the residents at Calafia Condos, a pod of a couple of hundred or so of long-beaked dolphins working together in a coordinated hunting dance to encircle fish that ends up in a spectacular feast where even the seagulls and pelicans join in.

Enjoy the video.


For more information on Calafia Condos and Baja real estate please visit http://www.bajarealestategroup.net

Casa Piedra: Luxury Mexico Real Estate in Rosarito Beach

Casa Piedra in the privacy of the oceanfront community of Las Gaviotas

Nestled along the Baja Coast, a mere 1 hour from downtown San Diego, is the exclusive oceanfront hamlet of Las Gaviotas in Rosarito Beach. For over thirty years this Baja community has set the standard for coastal living in the Northern Baja corridor. A secure community with exemplary amenities, Las Gaviotas is home to the most esteemed estates on the Baja Coast.

Casa Piedra represents the pinnacle of this oceanfront village. Located on the prestigious south end of the community this property, built to exacting standards in 2002 by famed architect Roberto Moreno, is being offered for the first time to the discerning buyer.
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New Mexican Immigration Regulations

On Thursday, FRAO invited Lic. Marisol Angulo, director of the INAMI office in Rosarito Beach to discuss the new immigration policies and procedures.

New Mexican Immigration Regulations

New Mexican Immigration Regulations

Key information from the meeting:

  •  The former FM3 and FM2 is being replaced by a Visa Temporal, or temporary visa.  After 4 years of holding a Visa Temporal you can apply for “permanent status” and then you no longer have to renew your visa on a regular basis, unless something changes, such as your marital or employment status, you move, or your citizenship changes.
  •  To apply, you must be able to show income of $30,000 MX per month.  Or at $12.50 MX pesos to the US dollar, $2,400.00 US per month, per person.  There is no variance for a shared household; two people need to show $60,000 MX or $4,800.00 US per month.  (FYI:  To qualify for permanent residence in the US, a foreign resident must prove 125% of the federal poverty level, or currently about $1,576.00 US per month for a family of two.)
  •  To prove your income, you need bank statements to document income employment or government pension deposits.
  •  Further, if your income is from employment or government pension you need bank statements from a Mexican bank, or if from a US bank, the statements must be translated by an official translator showing FOUR months of this kind of income.
  •  If part or your income is from investments, rental income, etc., then you must provide TWELVE months of bank statements showing this income.

The first step to applying for your Visa Temporal is to obtain a FMM, or “tourist visa” and this visa must be obtained at a Mexican embassy or consul office.  The closest one to Rosarito is San Diego.  This document is only valid for 30 days, and you must begin your application process within that 30 days.  If you go past the 30 days to begin the process, there is a significant fine.

Foreign Residents Attention Office

Foreign Residents Attention Office

If you entered Mexico on an FMM tourist visa obtained at the border, good for 180 days, this is not correct for anything other than a casual tourist visitor.  To obtain the 30 day visa, you must first go to an INAMI office and have the 180 day visa cancelled, even if it is expired.  If you have lost or destroyed that expired 180 day visa and it cannot be cancelled, you are in violation of Mexican law.  If you have an expired FM-2 or FM-3, it must be “cancelled” before beginning any new process.  If your expired FM-2 / FM-3 has been stolen, lost or destroyed you must go to the Ministerio Publico and file a report then present this report to local immigration BEFORE going to the Mexican consulate to apply for the FMM.

The benefit of the new system is that once you achieve permanent status or immigrado status, (which can lead to Mexican citizenship) you no longer have the expense of indefinite renewals as we currently have with the FM-2 and FM-3.

You must have some affiliation (work or residence) with Rosarito Beach to process your application in the Rosarito Beach INAMI office.  For example, if you live in San Antonio del Mar, you are in Tijuana and must go to the Tijuana office.  If you live in La Mision, you must go to the Ensenada office.

If you are a board member or officer of any community group, or “Civil Association” you must have a work permit, and that number must be on your Visa Temporal.  If not, you are in violation of Mexican law.

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Relocating to Rosarito Beach? Look for the best Rosarito Beach Real Estate. Baja Real Estate Group

On Thursday, FRAO invited Lic. Marisol Angulo, director of the INAMI office in Rosarito Beach to discuss the new immigration policies and procedures.

Key information from the meeting:

· The former FM3 and FM2 is being replaced by a Visa Temporal, or temporary visa.  After 4 years of holding a Visa Temporal you can apply for “permanent status” and then you no longer have to renew your visa on a regular basis, unless something changes, such as your marital or employment status, you move, or your citizenship changes.
· To apply, you must be able to show income of $30,000 MX per month.  Or at $12.50 MX pesos to the US dollar, $2,400.00 US per month, per person.  There is no variance for a shared household; two people need to show $60,000 MX or $4,800.00 US per month.  (FYI:  To qualify for permanent residence in the US, a foreign resident must prove 125% of the federal poverty level, or currently about $1,576.00 US per month for a family of two.)
· To prove your income, you need bank statements to document income employment or government pension deposits.
· Further, if your income is from employment or government pension you need bank statements from a Mexican bank, or if from a US bank, the statements must be translated by an official translator showing FOUR months of this kind of income.
· If part or your income is from investments, rental income, etc., then you must provide TWELVE months of bank statements showing this income.

The first step to applying for your Visa Temporal is to obtain a FMM, or “tourist visa” and this visa must be obtained at a Mexican embassy or consul office.  The closest one to Rosarito is San Diego.  This document is only valid for 30 days, and you must begin your application process within that 30 days.  If you go past the 30 days to begin the process, there is a significant fine.

If you entered Mexico on an FMM tourist visa obtained at the border, good for 180 days, this is not correct for anything other than a casual tourist visitor.  To obtain the 30 day visa, you must first go to an INAMI office and have the 180 day visa cancelled, even if it is expired.  If you have lost or destroyed that expired 180 day visa and it cannot be cancelled, you are in violation of Mexican law.  If you have an expired FM-2 or FM-3, it must be “cancelled” before beginning any new process.  If your expired FM-2 / FM-3 has been stolen, lost or destroyed you must go to the Ministerio Publico and file a report then present this report to local immigration BEFORE going to the Mexican consulate to apply for the FMM.

The benefit of the new system is that once you achieve permanent status or immigrado status, (which can lead to Mexican citizenship) you no longer have the expense of indefinite renewals as we currently have with the FM-2 and FM-3.

You must have some affiliation (work or residence) with Rosarito Beach to process your application in the Rosarito Beach INAMI office.  For example, if you live in San Antonio del Mar, you are in Tijuana and must go to the Tijuana office.  If you live in La Mision, you must go to the Ensenada office.

If you are a board member or officer of any community group, or “Civil Association” you must have a work permit, and that number must be on your Visa Temporal.  If not, you are in violation of Mexican law.

New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California

TIJUANA, Mexico — Until recently, Baja California’s culinary contribution to the world amounted to the Caesar salad, a dish hardly associated with Mexican food. Beyond that, this long, thin peninsula was known more for its Chinese food and pizza thanks to the thousands of migrants from all over the world who began to settle the Mexican state south of California in the 19th century.

 New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California


New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California

Now a group of chefs wants to change that, working to create a unique cuisine largely based on fresh seafood caught in the seas flanking Baja and the produce from its fertile valley. The new culinary craze, known as Baja Med, is a fusion of Mexican food with influences from the Mediterranean and Asia.

The movement has resulted in dozens of restaurants that are helping to pull a new kind of tourist to the beleaguered border city – one who enjoys great food and art rather than a brothel and a cheap drunk. People attending conventions in San Diego think of crossing the border for dinner in Tijuana, said Javier Plascencia, the chef of Mision 19, whose quest to put his city on the culinary map was the subject of a New Yorker magazine profile earlier this year.

Baja Med mixes uniquely Mexican ingredients such as chicharron and cotija cheese with lemon grass and olive oil. Signature dishes include tempura fish tacos and deep sea shrimp served with fried marlin, baby farm tomatoes, scallions and a sauce made with local cheeses.

“What Baja Med proposes is for the ingredient to be the main actor in the kitchen,” said Miguel Angel Guerrero, chef of La Querencia, a Tijuana restaurant serving such dishes as beet carpaccio with blue cheese and mint vinaigrette. “Geographically, we are privileged because throughout the year we have a variety of products available. And yet, many generations have passed, and we still don’t have a regional cuisine.”

The port of Ensenada, 40 miles south of Tijuana, is one of the country’s largest for mussels, oysters, clams and shrimp, as well as a hotbed of blue tuna sea farming. Baja California is the fourth largest producing vegetables in Mexico, according to the state government. read more »