Tag Archives: Real Estate

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

The words that real estate professionals choose to describe a property in listing ads could potentially result in the home selling for a premium, suggests an analysis that looks at listing descriptions and their effect on sales price and probability of sale. For example, property descriptor words in listing ads, like granite countertops and wood-burning fireplace, can help net higher sales prices.

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Researcher Bennie Waller, a professor of finance and real estate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., found that each property characteristic mentioned in a listing increases the sale price by just under 1 percent and it’s probability of selling by, on average, 9.2 percent.

“That means a listing with 15 additional property characteristics sells for roughly a 13.5 percent price premium,” says Waller, who excluded standard features in his analysis, such as bedrooms. Waller and his co-authors examined more than 16,300 transactions between March 2000 and February 2009 from a south central Virginia MLS. read more »

Talks Of Ownership Laws in Mexico Generate Surge in Real Estate Sales

Changes to foreign ownership laws in Mexico expected to generate a surge in sales
The historical amendment to Mexican Constitutions´ 27th Article, has stirred the interest in   properties along the Baja Riviera, as evidenced by the surge of real-estate activity along the Northern Baja Coast. “We have seen an important increase in the number of inquiries by potential clients since discussion about the reform hit international media outlets”, said Maday Valdenegro, Sales Manager at Santa Barbara in Bajamar.

Manlio Fabio Beltrones - Mexican Federal Senator

Manlio Fabio Beltrones – Mexican Federal Senator

The amendment to article 27 was approved by the Mexican Senate on April 23rd, “but it still needs to be approved by a majority of Congresses of each of the States in Mexico for a reform of the law to be final”, noted   Javier Troncoso, an Attorney at Law based in Los Cabos

The reform would now allow foreigners to acquire real estate within the “Restricted Zone” (100 kilometers wide from the borders and 50 kilometers wide from the coastal shores).

“Historically, once an amendment has passed in the Mexican Senate, the State Congresses have approved it. An amendment to the Law of Foreign Ownership would still be needed”, added Troncoso. read more »

Huge Dolphin Pod at Calafia Condos – Baja Real Estate Group

 

Calafia Condos Resort & Villas. The area sits on a privileged location that is a window to an assortment of marine wild life, from sea lions, seals, seagulls to dolphins, whales and even orcas.


This video is a common sight for the residents at Calafia Condos, a pod of a couple of hundred or so of long-beaked dolphins working together in a coordinated hunting dance to encircle fish that ends up in a spectacular feast where even the seagulls and pelicans join in.

Enjoy the video.


For more information on Calafia Condos and Baja real estate please visit http://www.bajarealestategroup.net

Mexico, to attract U.S. retirees, may ease limits on landownership

By Tim Johnson
McClatchy Foreign Staff

For the first time in nearly a century, lawmakers are moving to allow non-Mexicans to buy coastal real estate and hold the deeds to it, without having to set up bank trusts or find silent Mexican partners.

Ocean Front Real Estate in Mexico

Ocean Front Real Estate in Mexico

Proponents of the change say it pushes Mexico toward the modern era, and is a sign of ebbing nationalism under President Enrique Pena Nieto. They say it will help Mexico compete with Southern U.S. states and tropical Central America for U.S. retirees seeking spots in the sun and by the sea.

The proposed amendment to the Mexican Constitution sailed through the Chamber of Deputies on a 356-119 vote April 23, and is now before the Senate.

But opponents are still rallying, charging in a petition campaign that the change may condemn Mexicans to saying goodbye to ocean views.

“If just one of every 20 U.S. millionaires buys a house with 22 meters (72 feet) of beachfront, no Mexican will see the sea again,” the petition drive says, drawing on the nation’s historic allergy to foreign ownership of its resources.

The allergy has its roots in land grabs in the 19th and 20th centuries. After the 1917 Mexican revolution, legislators who drafted the nation’s constitution, fearing a new invasion by land or sea, barred foreigners from owning land within 31 miles of the coast or 62 miles of any border. Those strips of territory became known as the restricted zones. read more »

New Mexican Immigration Regulations

On Thursday, FRAO invited Lic. Marisol Angulo, director of the INAMI office in Rosarito Beach to discuss the new immigration policies and procedures.

New Mexican Immigration Regulations

New Mexican Immigration Regulations

Key information from the meeting:

  •  The former FM3 and FM2 is being replaced by a Visa Temporal, or temporary visa.  After 4 years of holding a Visa Temporal you can apply for “permanent status” and then you no longer have to renew your visa on a regular basis, unless something changes, such as your marital or employment status, you move, or your citizenship changes.
  •  To apply, you must be able to show income of $30,000 MX per month.  Or at $12.50 MX pesos to the US dollar, $2,400.00 US per month, per person.  There is no variance for a shared household; two people need to show $60,000 MX or $4,800.00 US per month.  (FYI:  To qualify for permanent residence in the US, a foreign resident must prove 125% of the federal poverty level, or currently about $1,576.00 US per month for a family of two.)
  •  To prove your income, you need bank statements to document income employment or government pension deposits.
  •  Further, if your income is from employment or government pension you need bank statements from a Mexican bank, or if from a US bank, the statements must be translated by an official translator showing FOUR months of this kind of income.
  •  If part or your income is from investments, rental income, etc., then you must provide TWELVE months of bank statements showing this income.

The first step to applying for your Visa Temporal is to obtain a FMM, or “tourist visa” and this visa must be obtained at a Mexican embassy or consul office.  The closest one to Rosarito is San Diego.  This document is only valid for 30 days, and you must begin your application process within that 30 days.  If you go past the 30 days to begin the process, there is a significant fine.

Foreign Residents Attention Office

Foreign Residents Attention Office

If you entered Mexico on an FMM tourist visa obtained at the border, good for 180 days, this is not correct for anything other than a casual tourist visitor.  To obtain the 30 day visa, you must first go to an INAMI office and have the 180 day visa cancelled, even if it is expired.  If you have lost or destroyed that expired 180 day visa and it cannot be cancelled, you are in violation of Mexican law.  If you have an expired FM-2 or FM-3, it must be “cancelled” before beginning any new process.  If your expired FM-2 / FM-3 has been stolen, lost or destroyed you must go to the Ministerio Publico and file a report then present this report to local immigration BEFORE going to the Mexican consulate to apply for the FMM.

The benefit of the new system is that once you achieve permanent status or immigrado status, (which can lead to Mexican citizenship) you no longer have the expense of indefinite renewals as we currently have with the FM-2 and FM-3.

You must have some affiliation (work or residence) with Rosarito Beach to process your application in the Rosarito Beach INAMI office.  For example, if you live in San Antonio del Mar, you are in Tijuana and must go to the Tijuana office.  If you live in La Mision, you must go to the Ensenada office.

If you are a board member or officer of any community group, or “Civil Association” you must have a work permit, and that number must be on your Visa Temporal.  If not, you are in violation of Mexican law.

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Relocating to Rosarito Beach? Look for the best Rosarito Beach Real Estate. Baja Real Estate Group

On Thursday, FRAO invited Lic. Marisol Angulo, director of the INAMI office in Rosarito Beach to discuss the new immigration policies and procedures.

Key information from the meeting:

· The former FM3 and FM2 is being replaced by a Visa Temporal, or temporary visa.  After 4 years of holding a Visa Temporal you can apply for “permanent status” and then you no longer have to renew your visa on a regular basis, unless something changes, such as your marital or employment status, you move, or your citizenship changes.
· To apply, you must be able to show income of $30,000 MX per month.  Or at $12.50 MX pesos to the US dollar, $2,400.00 US per month, per person.  There is no variance for a shared household; two people need to show $60,000 MX or $4,800.00 US per month.  (FYI:  To qualify for permanent residence in the US, a foreign resident must prove 125% of the federal poverty level, or currently about $1,576.00 US per month for a family of two.)
· To prove your income, you need bank statements to document income employment or government pension deposits.
· Further, if your income is from employment or government pension you need bank statements from a Mexican bank, or if from a US bank, the statements must be translated by an official translator showing FOUR months of this kind of income.
· If part or your income is from investments, rental income, etc., then you must provide TWELVE months of bank statements showing this income.

The first step to applying for your Visa Temporal is to obtain a FMM, or “tourist visa” and this visa must be obtained at a Mexican embassy or consul office.  The closest one to Rosarito is San Diego.  This document is only valid for 30 days, and you must begin your application process within that 30 days.  If you go past the 30 days to begin the process, there is a significant fine.

If you entered Mexico on an FMM tourist visa obtained at the border, good for 180 days, this is not correct for anything other than a casual tourist visitor.  To obtain the 30 day visa, you must first go to an INAMI office and have the 180 day visa cancelled, even if it is expired.  If you have lost or destroyed that expired 180 day visa and it cannot be cancelled, you are in violation of Mexican law.  If you have an expired FM-2 or FM-3, it must be “cancelled” before beginning any new process.  If your expired FM-2 / FM-3 has been stolen, lost or destroyed you must go to the Ministerio Publico and file a report then present this report to local immigration BEFORE going to the Mexican consulate to apply for the FMM.

The benefit of the new system is that once you achieve permanent status or immigrado status, (which can lead to Mexican citizenship) you no longer have the expense of indefinite renewals as we currently have with the FM-2 and FM-3.

You must have some affiliation (work or residence) with Rosarito Beach to process your application in the Rosarito Beach INAMI office.  For example, if you live in San Antonio del Mar, you are in Tijuana and must go to the Tijuana office.  If you live in La Mision, you must go to the Ensenada office.

If you are a board member or officer of any community group, or “Civil Association” you must have a work permit, and that number must be on your Visa Temporal.  If not, you are in violation of Mexican law.

New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California

TIJUANA, Mexico — Until recently, Baja California’s culinary contribution to the world amounted to the Caesar salad, a dish hardly associated with Mexican food. Beyond that, this long, thin peninsula was known more for its Chinese food and pizza thanks to the thousands of migrants from all over the world who began to settle the Mexican state south of California in the 19th century.

 New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California


New fusion cuisine flourishes in Baja California

Now a group of chefs wants to change that, working to create a unique cuisine largely based on fresh seafood caught in the seas flanking Baja and the produce from its fertile valley. The new culinary craze, known as Baja Med, is a fusion of Mexican food with influences from the Mediterranean and Asia.

The movement has resulted in dozens of restaurants that are helping to pull a new kind of tourist to the beleaguered border city – one who enjoys great food and art rather than a brothel and a cheap drunk. People attending conventions in San Diego think of crossing the border for dinner in Tijuana, said Javier Plascencia, the chef of Mision 19, whose quest to put his city on the culinary map was the subject of a New Yorker magazine profile earlier this year.

Baja Med mixes uniquely Mexican ingredients such as chicharron and cotija cheese with lemon grass and olive oil. Signature dishes include tempura fish tacos and deep sea shrimp served with fried marlin, baby farm tomatoes, scallions and a sauce made with local cheeses.

“What Baja Med proposes is for the ingredient to be the main actor in the kitchen,” said Miguel Angel Guerrero, chef of La Querencia, a Tijuana restaurant serving such dishes as beet carpaccio with blue cheese and mint vinaigrette. “Geographically, we are privileged because throughout the year we have a variety of products available. And yet, many generations have passed, and we still don’t have a regional cuisine.”

The port of Ensenada, 40 miles south of Tijuana, is one of the country’s largest for mussels, oysters, clams and shrimp, as well as a hotbed of blue tuna sea farming. Baja California is the fourth largest producing vegetables in Mexico, according to the state government. read more »

Cost Of Living In Mexico

 

WITH AN ESTIMATED COST OF LIVING THAT IS 30 PERCENT LESS THAN IN THE STATES, BUDGET-CONCIOUS HOMEBUYERS ARE LOOKING SOUTH TO MEXICO

CALAFIA, Baja California – Early retirement, a lower cost of living and being able to maintain your lifestyle while watching your wallet are all reasons why  American buyers have turned to  Mexican real estate especially in our struggling economy, said  Max Katz, sales director at Calafia Condos Resort and Villas, a new community in Baja California. Once considered to be a well-kept secret, the significantly lower cost of living in Mexico paired with great home values are attracting Americans south of the border who want a great home and a rich lifestyle at a fraction of the cost.

Calafia Condos Resort & Villas

Calafia Condos Resort & Villas

Overall, the cost of living in Mexico is about 30 percent less than in the U.S., he said.

“Golf here is cheaper than compared to the U.S.,” said Bob Dawson who moved to Mexico 13 years ago with his wife Carol.  “The food is good too.  In fact, just the other day I bought a delicious thick rib eye steak for only $5.  Ocean fishing here is excellent and it is quite easy and cheap to rent a boat for a day excursion.”

The Dawsons moved to Mexico 13 years ago so that Bob could retire five years sooner.  They now own a home at Calafia Condos Resort and Villas, which is only 30 minutes south of the international border.  The favorite part of their home is the great ocean view and they can even watch whales migrating from the balcony.    read more »

Real estate trends: History and culture

 

Santa Barbara at Bajamar.
History, art, nature, golf… everything is possible when you wake up in Paradise

Vacation property buyers want their leisure days to bring them a sense of revitalization. But that does not necessarily mean lying in the sun at a crowded beach.

Father Kino Mission in San Ignacio

Father Kino Mission in San Ignacio

There is another, far more interesting way to achieve a feeling of renewal. Getting exposed to art, nature and history awakens our senses and stimulates the mind. But the idea is not to run through ruins, galleries and museums in a crazy race, like they do at those 8-day-and-25-cities-tours.

What we wish for is a place to explore the surroundings at our own pace, little by little, capriciously.

“Some people just take the car and go see the cave-paintings” says Maday Valdenegro from the Baja Real Esatte Group. “There are loads of interesting sites nearby: the missions, museums, La Bufadora –a marine geyser, whale watching”.

This is a sample of the things I did as a visitor to Santa Barbara.
read more »

Mexico’s Wine Country in Valle de Guadalupe

By: KATY MCLAUGHLIN

Head to Valle de Guadalupe for upscale wineries, chic hotels and a south-of-the-border answer to the French Laundry.

WE WERE WATCHING the kids swim in his backyard pool in Los Angeles when my friend Juan Carlos, who grew up in Tijuana, began raving about a life-altering bowl of chicken soup he’d recently eaten.

Mexico's Wine Country in Valle De Guadalupe

Mexico’s Wine Country in Valle De Guadalupe

“It was at the Mexican version of the French Laundry,” he said. “You know—a fancy, farm-to-table place in the middle of Mexican wine country.”

I had no idea, I sheepishly admitted, there was wine country in Mexico, nor anything resembling the French Laundry. But Valle de Guadalupe is a Mediterranean microclimate in Baja California where wine has been produced for more than a century, and it’s in the midst of the kind of winemaking and tourism renaissance that Napa Valley experienced in the 1970s.

A decade ago, the area was mostly known in the wine scene for being home to L.A. Cetto, a huge maker of mid-market wines—the Mexican version of E. & J. Gallo. Today Valle de Guadalupe boasts scores of artisanal wineries; the region’s wine has improved and become trendy enough to be served in fashionable Mexico City restaurants. Top chefs are opening eateries in the area, and several stylish boutique hotels have been built in the past few years.

It sounded irresistible, so a few months later, I found myself caravanning, with Juan Carlos, his wife and my husband in one car, another couple of friends in theirs, across the Mexican border and south on the Tijuana-Ensenada Cuota toward Valle de Guadalupe, a 3½-hour ride from L.A.

We ditched our plan to drive directly to the valley when Juan Carlos pointed out Bar Villa Ortega, his favorite spot in Puerto Nuevo, for Pacific lobster, placemat-size flour tortillas and micheladas—pressed lemon over ice with beer in a salt-rimmed glass. We sat on a spacious covered patio built on a bluff, making us feel like we were eating on the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

We arrived in the valley with our bellies full of lobster and ears full of mariachi music. Flanked by low sierras, a carpet of glimmering green vines heavy with fruit stretched over the valley, interrupted by the occasional winery. These varied in style from sleek, modern structures to rustic haciendas. If it hadn’t been for the dirt roads and the lack of a chic town square, I would have thought I was in Sonoma. read more »

Mexico Real Estate Snapshot For The Baja Real Estate Group – By Max Katz

Hi I am Max Katz Broker and Owner of the Baja Real Estate Group.

I want to share with you what we are experiencing in the Rosarito, Ensenada Corridor. These first six months of 2012, sales have doubled. Homes, that are well priced, sometimes are seeing multiple offers and selling close to list price. Much of the activity we are seeing is not only due to price, but a credit to our seasoned agents. Our marketing and sales training are paying off.

As sales double so has our market reach from Canada to Mexico City. Our buyers range from retires looking for a better lifestyle to the second home buyer looking for a beach front getaway.

I am very proud of our online marketing team, they have done an outstanding job. Adding features that make it very easy for buyers to become well informed. They have given our sellers incredible marketing exposure; through open house videos posted YouTube, social media and one of their newest marketing tools the 360º Virtual tours.

Referrals also remain a big part of who we are at the Baja Real Estate Group, We want to thank our friends, family and neighbors for always thinking of us when thinking of Mexico Real Estate.

Please take the time to read our newsletters, they are always filled with great information for both Buyers and Sellers. If you are not on our mailing list. Please sign up at News@bajaREgroup.com. If you are interest in Buying or selling your home in Mexico. please contact one of our agents at Sales@bajaREgroup.com.

We will make it as easy as possible.

Once again thank you, our customer, for helping make the start of 2012 a success!

Max Katz
Broker/Owner
Baja Real Estate Group
(619) 200-7408
http://www.bajarealestategroup.net