Tag Archives: Guadalupe Valley

The 10 Best Places to Retire in Mexico

 

The 10 Best Places to Retire in Mexico
January 15, 2014

Below is an unbiased look at the best places in Mexico to retire – with real pros and cons – to help you make an informed decision as to which best meets your needs, interests and ambitions.

So writes “Johnny Punish” (www.JohnnyPunish.com) in edited excerpts from his article written originally as an exclusive for www.munKNEE.com (Your Key to Making Money!) and under the title The Top 10 Places to Live and Retire in Mexico and the reasons why. Note: this paragraph must be included in any re-posting to avoid copyright infringement.

The 10 Best Places to Retire in Mexico

The 10 Best Places to Retire in Mexico

Punish goes on to say:

In the process of putting together this comprehensive report I have consulted with highly experienced ex-pats who have lived and/or live in the places that I rate here so, without further wait, here’s the top 10 places to live and retire in Mexico and the reasons why:

1. Lake Chapala, Jalisco
2. Ensenada, Baja California
3. San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato
4. Guadalajara, Jalisco
5. Merida, Yucatan
6. Riviera Maya, Quintana Roo
7. Mazatlan, Sinaloa
8. Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco
9. La Paz, Baja California
10. San Cristobal de las Casas Chiapas

1. Lake Chapala, Jalisco (Winner)

According to Kristina Morgan of Focus on Mexico, “Of all the places in Mexico I have been, none can quite compare with Lake Chapala. There’s something about this place that just seems…magical and, as corny as it sounds, that’s the word I hear people use to describe Lake Chapala time and again. Lake Chapala gets into your heart and becomes home. It’s like stepping back 50-70 years here regarding the simpler lifestyle, culture and values. When I’m here I feel like I can be me, like I can breathe a little more freely and be the person I want to be and this is a sentiment expressed by most everyone who has ever been here or lives here”.

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An oasis of music and wine in Baja

 

 

An oasis of music and wine in Baja
Steve Lopez
Recent Columns
October 12, 2013, 12:05 p.m.

In the hills high above Ensenada, on the road to Ojos Negros, a dust-covered, mustachioed cowboy named Don Heriberto Aguilar has found the perfect life.

A trip to Aguilar’s rancho was not on my itinerary in Mexico. I was there to research a story, which will be coming soon, on more than three decades of good deeds performed in Baja California by the owners of Benning Violins in Studio City.

But Tito Quiroz, a musician who started Ensenada’s Academia Benning (which he named for his longtime mentors), was determined to give me and Times photographer Michael Robinson Chavez a look at a Mexico few visitors see. If we were interested, he said, he would take us to a party at a winery in the hills.

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ROSARITO AND ENSENADA ADVENTURES

ROSARITO AND ENSENADA ADVENTURES – Rides in Rosarito, dining in Ensenada offer memorable views and moments south of the border
By Wendy Lemlin Oct. 13, 2013

If you go – Getting there

Cross the border at San Ysidro and bear to the right, following signs for Rosarito-Ensenada Scenic Road and then signs for Ensenada Cuota. For the Rosarito Beach Hotel and Susanna’s, take the third Rosarito exit, and continue straight to Blvd. Benito Juarez.

Returning to the U.S.

Important: You must have a valid passport to re-enter the United States.

Some hotels and restaurants, including the Rosarito Beach Hotel and Susanna, offer a one-time “Fast Pass” allowing access to the faster, specifically designated border lanes.

Ensenada lodging
Casa Natalie: Hotelncasanatalie.com/English.
Hotel Coral & Marina: Hotelcoral.com
Rosarito Beach lodging
Rosarito Beach Hotel: RosaritoBeachHotel.com
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Mexico’s Wine Country in Valle de Guadalupe

By: KATY MCLAUGHLIN

Head to Valle de Guadalupe for upscale wineries, chic hotels and a south-of-the-border answer to the French Laundry.

WE WERE WATCHING the kids swim in his backyard pool in Los Angeles when my friend Juan Carlos, who grew up in Tijuana, began raving about a life-altering bowl of chicken soup he’d recently eaten.

Mexico's Wine Country in Valle De Guadalupe

Mexico’s Wine Country in Valle De Guadalupe

“It was at the Mexican version of the French Laundry,” he said. “You know—a fancy, farm-to-table place in the middle of Mexican wine country.”

I had no idea, I sheepishly admitted, there was wine country in Mexico, nor anything resembling the French Laundry. But Valle de Guadalupe is a Mediterranean microclimate in Baja California where wine has been produced for more than a century, and it’s in the midst of the kind of winemaking and tourism renaissance that Napa Valley experienced in the 1970s.

A decade ago, the area was mostly known in the wine scene for being home to L.A. Cetto, a huge maker of mid-market wines—the Mexican version of E. & J. Gallo. Today Valle de Guadalupe boasts scores of artisanal wineries; the region’s wine has improved and become trendy enough to be served in fashionable Mexico City restaurants. Top chefs are opening eateries in the area, and several stylish boutique hotels have been built in the past few years.

It sounded irresistible, so a few months later, I found myself caravanning, with Juan Carlos, his wife and my husband in one car, another couple of friends in theirs, across the Mexican border and south on the Tijuana-Ensenada Cuota toward Valle de Guadalupe, a 3½-hour ride from L.A.

We ditched our plan to drive directly to the valley when Juan Carlos pointed out Bar Villa Ortega, his favorite spot in Puerto Nuevo, for Pacific lobster, placemat-size flour tortillas and micheladas—pressed lemon over ice with beer in a salt-rimmed glass. We sat on a spacious covered patio built on a bluff, making us feel like we were eating on the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

We arrived in the valley with our bellies full of lobster and ears full of mariachi music. Flanked by low sierras, a carpet of glimmering green vines heavy with fruit stretched over the valley, interrupted by the occasional winery. These varied in style from sleek, modern structures to rustic haciendas. If it hadn’t been for the dirt roads and the lack of a chic town square, I would have thought I was in Sonoma. read more »

This is why you buy Ensenada Real Estate

 

As the sun rises in Baja, I am anxious to get out and meander along the beautiful walking paths around this beautiful Ensenada ocean front resort.
The fresh ocean air blows gently this morning and I feel like heading out from my house to watch all of the sea birds soar just above the waves looking for breakfast.
There are gentle one to two foot waves lapping at the shore.
As I walk along the cobblestone path, I remind myself that I am in such aspecial place. 
Sometimes, I take it for granted.
This morning, I was awakened by a beautiful quail sauntering along the top on my rear balcony with the mountains beyond.
Outside the front door is the Whale Watch where the migration of whales up and down the coast is a sight to behold.
So many areas in this 1750 acre gated complex have such diverse sights and sounds.
Every day is a NEW DAY full And life and beauty in this paradise called Bajamar.
Come let us take you on a Ensenada Real Estate tour. 

This is why you buy Ensenada Real Estate

This is why you buy Ensenada Real Estate

 

Mimi Mills  Mimi.mills@live.com
Baja Real Estate Group    www.bajapremierproeprties.com

Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Lured by spicy quail, tuna ceviche, and Mexico’s best fish tacos, T+L lights out for Ensenada—and from there, things just go south.
From May 2010 By Peter Jon Lindberg

Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Culinary Tour of Baja, Mexico

Ensenada and the nearby Valle de Guadalupe, in northern Baja, are known outside Mexico for three things: the burgeoning local wine scene, which has been hyped ad infinitum; the food, which hasn’t been hyped enough; and the spectacularly bad roads, which everyone warns you about, though you never fully believe them. Really, you think, how bad could they be? And then one night in the gathering dark you take an innocent shortcut across the valley and drive your rented Hyundai into a riverbed. A dry riverbed, but a riverbed all the same. You and your equally baffled companion spend 40 minutes spinning the car’s wheels in what might as well be quicksand, then digging frantically, then panicking, then digging and spinning some more, until finally you resolve to abandon the car and hike the two miles back to the highway—suitcases sinking in gravel, sand filling your socks. And as the coyotes wail in the ink-black hills you decide that you probably should have paid more attention to that part about the roads.

“Ah, the Baja shortcut!” said our innkeeper, Phil Gregory, when, at the conclusion of said ordeal, he collected us and our dusty belongings from the side of Highway 3. “Never a good idea!” Severe rains the previous week, our host explained, had caused the river to flood, washing away a whole chunk of the road we were on. Those tire tracks I’d followed across the sandy riverbed—believing we were still on course—had been left by a backhoe, dispatched to repair the road. No one had bothered to post a sign, let alone erect a fence. “Honestly, this happens all the time,” Gregory said as we rattled down the inn’s rutted dirt driveway. He meant this to be reassuring. “But let’s get you settled, pour you some wine, and we’ll retrieve your car in the morning!”

Gregory’s tone was oddly chipper—maybe this did happen all the time? After showering off the dust, we sampled the inn’s own Tempranillo beside a crackling mesquite fire in the lounge. Not the smoothest specimen, but it worked: two glasses later I gave up worrying about the Hyundai. read more »

Lindsay Lohan needs a Mexican Vacation away from the media and the paparazzi!

Sandy Beach at Palacio Del Mar

Sandy Beach at Palacio Del Mar

Lindsay Lohan and other famous starts such as Britney Spears have often looked south of the border to take advantage of a US resort style beachfront community with luxurious ocean front villas for relaxation and to take breather from the US Media and the paparazzi frenzy.

At Palacio Del Mar, Baja’s newest luxury condos and spa, Lindsay could take advantage of one many Palacio Del Mar  amenities: Palacio’s private shuttle service, picking her up at the airport or a private location of her choice and riding just 45 minutes away south to Ensenada. She could have her own pool or Jacuzzi in one of Palacios 2800ft² 3 bedroom Condos or a private tour of the Guadalupe Valley, the largest wine region in northern Mexico, where she can sample award wining wines and food. Lindsay could also have a gourmet meal at Ensenada’s famous Restaurant Ofelia’s. read more »

In Tequila’s Home, a Wine Region Comes of Age – The Guadalupe Valley

In Tequila's Home, a Wine Region Comes of Age - The Guadalupe Valley

In Tequila's Home, a Wine Region Comes of Age - The Guadalupe Valley

The first time I went to Mexican wine country, I found myself digging my car out of a muddy river bed at 11 at night. It speaks volumes about the area’s charm that this didn’t deter me from a second trip, four months later. This time, I destroyed one of my sedan’s axles in a pothole and popped a tire.

And yet, I still plan to visit again. Next time, I’ll bring an S.U.V.

Wine tasting in the Guadalupe Valley of Mexico is an adventure sport; not an endeavor for the weak of will. There is the matter of the roads. They are dirt-surfaced, they frequently require that you drive straight through riverbeds and, thanks to a winter of record storms, they currently resemble the pitted surface of the moon. Then there are the obstacles to actually tasting wines: many wineries require appointments, and a working knowledge of Spanish is definitely an asset.

Persevere, however, and you could find yourself at the bucolic ranch of Antonio Badán, sampling a generous glass of elegant Mogor-Badán Chasselas with the winemaker himself. Mr. Badán’s tasting room consists of a folding table in a corner of the small concrete building where he produces his wines. The chairs are wobbly; the walls are bare. From the tasting room, you can look over the vegetable gardens, the henhouse and the grazing cattle to the budding grapevines on the valley floor. read more »

Bonus Rains could mean a Banner Year for Mexican Wines

By Steve Dryden

Grape Vineyards in the Guadalupe Valley

Grape Vineyards in the Guadalupe Valley

The 2010 vintage is off and running with a large dose of rainfall soaking the soil and roots in vineyards across Valle de Guadalupe and other grape growing regions in Baja California, Mexico. So far we’ve received an above average level of moisture in a normally drought ridden region, thus bringing extra hope to growers and winemakers for this vintage. Most of the vines still remain in a dormant condition, but bud swelling is evident and it appears that an early bud-break may be upon us soon.

In addition, the winter weather in the valley (elevation avg. is 1,100 feet) has been mild and warmer than usual. Many vineyard managers and workers have already pruned their vines or are in the process of doing so. The only bad news is there are lots of weeds and wild grasses this year, but the surplus of water is a real blessing, making most wine industry personnel excited about 2010.

Highway construction in the valley continues to progress, but at times it seemed we went back in time about 100 years. This wet winter allowed locals and guests the opportunity to ford rivers, streams and large puddles of water as we toured the valley in search of wine, food and adventure. Now we know what it might have been like when the early settlers and the Russian Molokans hauled grain and goods to San Diego with horses and wagons. In 1925, it was a three day trip to downtown San Diego with teams of horses and wagons navigating several rivers between the valley, Tecate and Jamul. The good news is that the new road that traverses the wine country along Highway 3 should be completed by May 2010. It’s open now in some parts, but be ready for road hazards, mud, and dramatic bumps in the various (unmarked) surfaces of dirt and pavement. read more »

A heartfelt Gracias! – A Baja Real Estate Testimonial

Written By: Professor Wade Lorentzon aka Lorenzo

Children of Casa de Paz

Children of Casa de Paz

I am a professor of Psychology here in Calgary and for the past ten summers have brought teams of 25 eager dedicated students for the month of August to work with the 55 children of Casa de Paz, nestled in the beautiful vineyard filled Guadalupe valley. The orphanage is a sanctuary, an oasis of love and careful family nurture on a 20 hectare working vegetable farm.

A year ago to continue my vision for a Beach house/guest home for returning students and their families I inquired at Calafia and met my new found friends Max and Kathy Katz, who represent the selling of many fine condo and homes along the gold coast of Baja. read more »