Category Archives: Baja Real Estate

Northern Baja real estate related topics

International Living’s 10 Best Places To Retire Around The World In 2017

International Living’s 10 Best Places To Retire Around The World In 2017

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Photo credit: Shutterstock

There’s a new best country in the world to retire, according to the experts at International Living (IL), an authority on global retirement and relocation opportunities. In its Annual Global Retirement Index, the new best country has edged out last year’s No.

CoolR / Shutterstock

10. Malta

This small, historic European nation is beautiful and extraordinary. It’s actually a chain of islands between Sicily and North Africa.

International Living says retirees can expect 300 days of sun, mild winter, a laidback atmosphere and a large, welcoming international, English-speaking community.

The cost of living is higher than others on IL’s list, though: A couple can live comfortable for less than $2,700 a month and rent a two-bedroom in Sliema, one of Malta’s liveliest cities, for about $800 a month, says IL correspondent Barbara Diggs.

Health care here is excellent and a bargain: a GP visit costs around $20; a specialist may run $65.

And if you’re craving to visit Paris, IL editors say, you can hop an Air Malta flight — a roundtrip costs as little as $175.


Sergio Stakhnyk / Shutterstock

9. Portugal

Spain’s neighbor to the west, Portugal attracts retirees due to its low cost of living, mild climate, Atlantic Ocean beaches and the fact that many locals speak English. But International Living says the country’s lifestyle is, in many ways, classic Mediterranean.

The Lisbon area is a favorite with expats, say IL editors. So is the nation’s second largest city, Porto — best for those who prefer cool weather.

The Algarve region, which frequently appears on Best Places to Retire lists, is known for its golf courses, beaches and British expats.

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In Ensenada, Cheap Mexican Charms Await

 

TRAVEL
In Ensenada, Cheap Mexican Charms Await
Jan.14.2015

For as long as I can remember, Ensenada has had a whiff of south-of-the-border excess and spring-break stigma. Less than two hours from San Diego, down the Baja California peninsula, it’s one of the easiest and safest places to experience Mexico on a budget — which makes it easy to think of this small coastal city and cruise line layover as a sort of Mexico for Beginners. But dismissing northwest Baja is a mistake. Beyond the souvenir shops selling sombreros, knockoff artesanía (handicrafts) and tacky T-shirts, there’s a college town, a port town and a budding culinary capital that invite exploration. While Ensenada and the surrounding area can require a bit of patience, its pleasures are worth the time it takes to find them — and all the more so because they can be had so affordably.

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A restaurant at La Bufadora, a powerful blowhole where families pose for photos as the Pacific sprays them with sea mist. Credit Freda Moon

 

I’ve had an affection for Ensenada since childhood, when it was a daylong car ride from my Northern California hometown and my introduction to international travel. In those days, I’ll admit, its beaches looked cleaner and the Pacific Ocean felt warmer. My brother and I would sip virgin piña coladas and spend hours scouring the beach for sand dollars. In college, it remained exotic in my mind — a place Tim, my then-boyfriend (now-husband), and I could go on winter break and feel like adventurous runaways. These days, Ensenada is simply the closest we can get to the Mexico we love without a plane ticket.

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Chefs, wine give Baja a new flavor

 

Chefs, wine give Baja a new flavor
Region’s gastro scene is boosting tourism and its image
By Michele Parente6:13 P.M.OCT. 18, 2014Updated12:14 P.M.OCT. 21, 2014

Last Sunday, chef Javier Plascencia was in Buenos Aires promoting Baja cuisine, having just taped an episode of ABC’s “The Taste” in L.A.

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Tijuana‘s new taste: The rustic chic interior of El Taller Baja Med Cocina. — Photo by Michele Parente

On Wednesday, chef Flor Franco was in New York cooking for about 160 editors at Condé Nast, publishers of such titles as The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Vogue and Condé Nast Traveler.

And during the first week in November, chef Miguel Ángel Guerrero will be in Paris, serving up rustic Baja Med cuisine to the French.

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Javier Plascencia’s popular Finca Altozano in the Valle de Guadalupe.— Photo by Michele Parente

The trio, with about 12 restaurants between them in San Diego, Tijuana, Ensenada and the Valle de Guadalupe, are Baja’s Emissaries of Eating. While out promoting their own businesses and brands, these globe-trotting gastro ambassadors are at the same time shifting the narrative of a region once known more for kidnappings and cartels than quail and kumamotos.

More than just reputation burnishing, Baja’s food and wine are driving new development around the region as well as an influx of first-time visitors from within Mexico, Europe, Asia and Latin America. It’s also reviving tourism from north of the border, which plummeted in 2008 as the global economy sunk and Tijuana’s death rate skyrocketed.

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Mexico’s Burgeoning Wine Scene

 

Mexico’s Burgeoning Wine Scene
The country may be best known for its beer and tequila, but that’s slowly changing

By WILL LYONS
Updated Oct. 23, 2014 7:50 p.m. ET

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Mexico’s Burgeoning Wine Scene

WHAT ARE THE WORLD’S most unlikely wine-producing countries? India, Russia, China? It may surprise you to learn that China has one of the world’s largest wine industries, with more than half a million hectares now planted with vines.

I have touched down in some unusually located vineyards—Brazil springs to mind—so I wasn’t surprised to hear that Mexico has a fast-growing wine industry. What did surprise me, though, was just how old it is. By common consensus, it seems vines were first planted there in the 1530s by Spanish settlers. One estate can trace its lineage back to 1597. Even by European standards, where there are centuries-old châteaux, 450 years is a long time to be in the wine game.

I expect many of you reading this will never have come across Mexican wine. After all, this is a country known more for its gassy lager and tequila than its grapes. But that’s slowly changing, and wines from regions like the Valle de Guadalupe on the Baja California peninsula, a few hours’ drive south of San Diego, have found their way onto various restaurant wine lists and specialist shops. But not many. Few are exported to Europe and tracking those down is no easy task.

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Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

The words that real estate professionals choose to describe a property in listing ads could potentially result in the home selling for a premium, suggests an analysis that looks at listing descriptions and their effect on sales price and probability of sale. For example, property descriptor words in listing ads, like granite countertops and wood-burning fireplace, can help net higher sales prices.

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Study: Words in Listing Ads Can Boost Sales Price

Researcher Bennie Waller, a professor of finance and real estate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va., found that each property characteristic mentioned in a listing increases the sale price by just under 1 percent and it’s probability of selling by, on average, 9.2 percent.

“That means a listing with 15 additional property characteristics sells for roughly a 13.5 percent price premium,” says Waller, who excluded standard features in his analysis, such as bedrooms. Waller and his co-authors examined more than 16,300 transactions between March 2000 and February 2009 from a south central Virginia MLS. read more »

18 thousand tourists flown away from Cabo in just three days in remarkable “air bridge” operation

The aftermath of Odile left 26,000 tourists stranded in Baja California, away from their homes, and with no communication means. But in a remarkable operation, the Mexican Government, the military and the private sector coordinated an “air bridge” that would move 18,000 tourist out of the affected region in three days.

By Thursday, Mexico’s Transportation Ministry declared that 18,000 people had already been flown out on more than 120 flights.

By Thursday, Mexico’s Transportation Ministry declared that 18,000 people had already been flown out on more than 120 flights.

Americans, Europeans, and others  were flown to major cities such as Guadalajara, Toluca, Mexico City and Los Mochas.  American passengers arriving at Tijuana were swiftly taken to San Diego.

Odile hit Baja California on Sunday, causing major damage to the International  San Jose Los Cabos Airport. By Tuesday, tens of military and commercial airplanes were flying out of the runway to lead tourists to safety.  Aeroméxico, Volaris and other Mexican airlines, were quick to react to the emergency,   establishing hotlines,   offering free trips to those in need and honoring fares for clients who had previously purchased their tickets.

By Thursday, Mexico’s Transportation Ministry declared that 18,000 people had already been flown out on more than 120 flights. “Rescue efforts will continue until every tourist is taken out of the region”, pledged the Ministry of Foreign Relations. Though the situation is not easy, and Mexico is still  faced with many challenges, the efforts to tend to the Tourist sector must be acknowledged.

We at the Baja Real Estate Group wish to make our best effort to aid the local Baja California population. Tens of thousands Mexican nationals that live and work in Cabo are without basic electricity and water, and in desperate need of basic products, shelter  and food.

These are several ways you can join us in helping our brothers in Baja California:

Financial aid
https://bisbeesconservationfund.org/Donate/CaboRelief

Items needed

  • Canned food/goods of any kind
  • Bottled water
  • Diapers
  • Bleach
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Buckets
  • Brooms
  • Towels / blankets

These are being collected at:

Rosarito DIF
The Lighthouse Sports Bar & Restaurant (KM 58 Carretera  Tijuana-Ensenada Libre)

Ship or deliver from 8 am-5pm to:
Mexicana Logistics US HQ
7734 Formula Place
San Diego, CA 92121

MEXICO DONATIONS
Ship or deliver from 8am-5pm to:
Mexicana Logistics Mex HQ
Calzada de las Americas #951
Col. Compuertas. Mexicali, BC 21218
(Cruzando la calle del Colegio de las Americas)

http://www.race-dezert.com/forum/threads/baja-strong-off-roaders-hurricane-relief.119455/

 

Mexico Developers Selling Cheaper Alternative to U.S. Luxury Senior Housing

 

Mexico Developers Selling Cheaper Alternative to U.S. Luxury Senior Housing
Jason Oliva-August 25, 2014

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Mexico Developers Selling Cheaper Alternative to U.S. Luxury Senior Housing.

A popular tourist spot, beachfront real estate and a newly converted resort hotel adds up to what developers say will give luxury senior housing in the U.S. a run for its money south of the border.

Those are the ingredients for Front Beach Retirement Mexico, a Mexican development company that sees opportunity in targeting American and Canadian seniors looking to retire in Mexico, particularly the widely popular tourist town of Puerto Vallarta.

Through an agreement with the Las Palmas Hotel, Puerto Vallarta-based Front Beach Retirement converted the 225 rooms of the all-inclusive hotel into an independent and assisted living community, Front Beach Puerto Vallarta.

“We’re offering a buffet-style of living,” says Front Beach Retirement and Mexico Assisted Living Marketing Director Joshua Ketner. “Rather than convert rooms into apartments, we left them at resort-style living.”

Though the company declined to disclose costs associated with the senior housing transformation, Ketner—who previously worked for A Place for Mom and as a caregiver at Aegis Living—told SHN that the overall spending on the conversion was minimal, as many of the rooms and accessibility features, such as hand rails, were already in place. The main cost, he says, was to convert a room into a doctor’s office.

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Mexico Developers Selling Cheaper Alternative to U.S. Luxury Senior Housing.

The community embraces its hospitality roots, offering amenities like housekeeping services, two swimming pools, various dining venues, large common areas, direct beach access, a Tiki Bar and Internet accessibility.

Where the campus caters to its senior clientele becomes apparent with medical alert systems in every room, daily activities programming, transportation to medical appointments, wheelchair accessibility and 24-hour care provided by on-site nurses as caregivers and a resident physician who also lives within the community.

Aside from the seaside real estate and all the resort-style amenities included, the biggest draws for the Puerto Vallarta community are its lower price points on monthly rent and healthcare, says Ketner.

For $3,000 a month, residents at the Puerto Vallarta community can enjoy rooms with panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean, as well as utilities such as air conditioning, electricity and water that are included in the rent. For double occupancy rooms, the monthly rent is $4,600.

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Mexico Developers Selling Cheaper Alternative to U.S. Luxury Senior Housing.

In the U.S., the costs for assisted living are considerably more expensive at $3,500 per month, according to the 2014 Genworth Cost of Care Survey. While this figure signals a 1.45% increase in the last year, costs for assisted living have grown 4.29% annually on a five-year basis—the highest of all long-term care settings recorded by Genworth.

A unique feature of the community is that it doesn’t restrict its age-50 and up cliente to a one-month stay minimum.

In another attempt to target those “snowbird” vacationers heading for warmer weather during their retirement years, Front Beach also offers one-week stays at $780 for single occupancy and $1,100 for doubles. Additionally, a two-week stay runs $1,509 for a single and $2,140 for a double room.

Still in its early stages of operations, with a grand opening slated in the next couple of weeks, Front Beach Puerto Vallarta has seen about 10 leads looking to move in come September so far.

“There’s quite the misconception of Mexico, but the economy is growing and there is a large middle class here,” says Ketner. “It’ll just take more time getting people accustomed to the idea, and us a few months to figure out what our niches are.”

http://seniorhousingnews.com/2014/08/25/mexico-developers-selling-cheaper-alternative-u-s-luxury-senior-housing/

Written by Jason Oliva

 

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Read more about the Baja style of living: http://www.bajarealestategroup.net/

After The Kids Have Gone: Former Spring Break Destination In Mexico Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper

 

After The Kids Have Gone: Former Spring Break Destination In Mexico Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper
By Rebekah SagerPublished July 18, 2014Fox News Latino

Town Once Known For Spring Breakers Finds Quieter Ways To Prosper

The Rosarito Beach area of Baja California in Mexico, once a thriving spring break locale that was decimated by crime and a collapsing economy, has had to find new, quieter ways to prosper.

Until 2008 or so, Rosarito Beach, about 10 miles south of the United States-Mexico border in Baja California, was a hot spot for kids on spring break looking to drink tequila, eat cheap lobster dinners and party the days and nights away. Then the economy crashed and crime reached epidemic proportions and suddenly the streets went from 24 hour fiesta to ghost town.

Baja Fresh Produce

The Rosarito Beach area of Baja California in Mexico, once a thriving spring break locale that was decimated by crime and a collapsing economy, has had to find new, quieter ways to prosper.

Until recently, that is. Today Rosarito is a thriving place for families, foodies and small businesses.

A visit to the only winery in Rosarito, Claudius, provides a glimpse into the innovation and resilience desperate (and resourceful) business owners in the area have gone through.

Julio Benitez, a native of Segovia, Spain, established the business just four years ago, and only this year is the label releasing its first bottles onto the market. The vinyard caters primarily to aficionados who can take classes at a small wine-making school, and a tasting room and restaurant for enthusiasts who would rather savor it.

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6 ways to stage your home for less than $1,000

 

6 ways to stage your home for less than $1,000
Make your house stand out to potential buyers without breaking the bank.
By Anne Kates Smith of Kiplinger

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6 ways to stage your home for less than $1,000

Staging a home for sale is all about making it inviting to the largest number of potential buyers. If a home is vacant, a stager will haul in furniture and décor so buyers can imagine themselves living there. If it’s occupied, the stager will declutter, neutralize and decorate for the masses.

Slide show: Real-world examples of home staging for less than $1,000
Staging won’t make a home sell for more than it’s worth. But it can set your home apart and boost the selling price to the top of the range for comparable homes. It can also cut the time on the market. Because nearly 90% of homebuyers start their search on the Internet, staging is a good way to make sure online photos pop.

Home sellers spend an average of $1,800 to stage a home, but costs can range from a couple of hundred dollars to $5,000 or more. Here are six ways to stage your home for less than $1,000.

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Housing inventory not much of an issue in northern Baja California, broker Kathy Katz says

 

Housing inventory not much of an issue in northern Baja California, broker Kathy Katz says

By GLENN GRANT, Special to The Daily Transcript
Tuesday, June 17, 2014

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Sales have doubled each of the past three years at Baja Real Estate Group in Rosarito Beach and Ensenada, says broker/co-owner Kathy Katz. Courtesy photo

Low housing inventory is a challenge for most San Diego County real estate firms. But it’s a different story just south of the border.

“We have great inventory in northern Baja California,” said Kathy Katz, broker and co-owner with husband Max Katz at Baja Real Estate Group in Rosarito Beach and Ensenada. “There’s been a lot of developer-financed new construction the past few years, but because we got hit by the economy along with everybody else, we have new standing inventory.”

Americans by birth, the Katzes have lived and worked in northern Baja for more than 20 years. They have a second home in Chula Vista but raised their children in Rosarito Beach, where they’re active in community affairs and among other Americans who live in the coastal city.

“I was doing vacation rentals in Rosarito, then met up with a developer and started re-launching his condos,” Kathy Katz said. “I was always in sales, so I guess this was my calling.”

The firm has clients in the United States, Baja and the Mexican interior, and prides itself on educating them about property ownership along the border. A client-relations staff member was recently hired to funnel prospective buyers to agents and help them make informed decisions.

The firm’s eight agents also help clear up prospective buyers’ apprehensions and beliefs about Mexican laws regarding foreign ownership, such as the 99-year land lease.

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